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20121104
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the libel make markets more transparent, stable and efficient. from george washington university law school, and this is 45 minutes. >> good morning. i am paul berman, 19 of the law school as art said and i want to welcome you to this conference and obviously welcome mary schapiro, chairman of the securities and exchange commission. so one of the things that i think makes this law school, the george washington university law school distinctive and different from other top law schools is the degree to which we are integrated into the real world of law and policy practice in this country. so one of the things we are always striving to do this not be an ivory tower academic institution solely, but also one that is always trying to engage the practicing bar, people from corporations, people who are not lawyers in the educational enterprise and also when public policy discussions. obviously we have a great advantage in being in washington d.c. and having so much access to the world of policy. but in addition, it's not just the location. it has to be your orientation as a law school. so it is som
the existing law and involved in the in that examinations of the impediments to affect the resolution and we are working on a cooperative basis to overcome those. so in conclusion, dodd-frank is certainly given the significant new responsibilities to address these risks associated in the recent financial crisis. you take these responsibilities seriously and we are ready to use these authorities when they are needed. hopefully not. but while the key provisions are now in place, we are continuing to implement the remaining provisions in rulemaking and we continue to refine our thinking on the process we increase transparency in the rest of the market's on these powerful new tools and how they can best be used to maintain financial stability and end to big to fail. i look forward to participating in the q&a. thank you very much. [applause] >> now for the downside. first i want to thank you professor bachmann for organizing this. it's an excellent panel i must say and i've always enjoyed being on the panel with space and rick. laughter come i want to take on everything that was said, so let me g
of wrong dog. >> do you have not think that a man who has been found guilty by due process of law ought to be slightly penitant? >> if it is in fact due process. you see, jeremy, your problem is you have no idea how that system operates. and you should know something about that. >> you're the one who chose to locate his business there. >> i did, yes. >> were you just foolish or what? >> in fact, i'd say that's slightly overstating it, but i made a mistake. i underestimated the vin at and corruption of the american legal system. i confess to that. i'm very penitant about it, too. >> what's astonishing is a man who has been through this should show no humidity and no shame. >> of course not. i've been persecuted half to death. i don't have any shame. i'm proud of having been in a u.s. federal prison and survived as well as i did. i had no problems whatsoever, not in the regime and not amongst the fellow residents. let me tell you something -- i am proud of having gone through the terribly difficult process of being falsely charged, falsely convicted and ultimately almost completely vindic
with you. the body of law and rule is incredibly complicated. some of that does pertain to the evil banker hypothesis. i'm amended hereby the corollary evil lobbyist hypothesis, but i would add my own cause, which is the cubicle regulator aided and abetted by the expert lawyer hypothesis. and maybe in my practice i spend a lot of time. and the bells of these rules. and when you say okay, i think i had it. here's the definition of proprietary trading. some lawyer will say well, actually there was lawler versus knickerbocker case in 1842 in which that definition was not upheld -- so for this to be really clear, with another 52 pages in the federal register. that may be good lawyering, but it is incoherent rulemaking. i don't know what to do about it. i just say this is one of my personally favored hypotheses is a big problem of complexity risk and why i go back to a few clear standards to which real institutions accountable, i written on the poker rules mav is hispanic@. we have to make some clear decisions here. this current come in never never land that's largely constructed by people to d
if the court continues down the path of sitting dog sniffs are not searches at all, law enforcement will be completely unfettered to use drug dogs however they wish. that could lead to a random sweeps of neighborhoods where people. limited and only by the restrictions the fourth abutment has on seizures. more broadly, again, as technology develops, if the court continues down the path of sitting there are some searches that, a detect contraband and are not searches at all, the encroachments on our privacy are going to increase ever further as technology moves on. >> i was a little puzzled as to what the florida supreme court really meant -- really wanted in the harris case. it is not just enough to say the dog has been certified, you need more performance evidence. how would that work? every time there is a case where drug evidence is used, the prosecution would have to come and and a show, what, there is some sort of test? he has gone out 100 times -- what would be the evidence that would be enough to convince a judge this dog was reliable? what's the traditional test for probable
training from here in the united states. i lead a rule law forum back to the states last january. all aimed at assisting the judicial system. as the saudi system has moved out on a number of areas, we have supported their efforts. in yemen, saudi arabia played a significant role in brokering a gcc led political transition agreement. and continue to provide a leadership role in the friends of yemen and support of the government. there have been the last few years a trend toward multilateralism. i say that with some reservation because certainly the gcc and the arab league have been active in the last two years in ways not previously seen. most recently, saudi arabia has pushed the idea of a gcc union patterned after the eu. for secretary clinton's national security operation form. last month in new york, it provides a venue for collaborative securities discussions with all of the gcc nations. but something has changed. it was reflected in the recent summit last august. i spoke with many of and some of them spoke with a different idea in the atmosphere of the meetings. one individual in parti
-span2. now more from the fordham law school conference. next, we hear from former cia acting general counsel john rizzo, and former justice department inspector general lyn fine. posted by the center on national security, this is an hour 20 minutes. >> okay, marty has charged us with finding all the solutions, and luckily i'm only the moderator so i would have to charge the three of you with giving us some solutions. i think the way this panel is organized is to provide context for what you just heard. i hadn't quite realized it would work as a will that we have the right people to give the right context, both in terms of the law, in terms of the post-9/11 decade and where it's taken us, in terms of the self-regulating institutional function of government, to figure out its own problems, make its own recommendations and maybe suggest its own solutions. and in terms of what all this means from the point of view of working in the field, on the ground, inside a covert realm. so we're going to try to tie this all together today by looking at some of these issues. and i have to trust that
, corporations, unions, other associations, not permitted to make contributions. that has been the law for more than 40 years. they are allowed to spend their own money independently of the campaign if they want to put cannot make such a patient. typically, presidential candidates raise money at the maximum level, they are well known nationally, lots of wealthy individuals and groups that want to support them. the obama campaign stands out in that respect of it. it is also importantthan 40 yea. they are allowed to spend their own to note, the caller is making another race has been more focused in many respects on a small number of individual people. these people have contributed hundreds of millions of dollars to the process. i think the number that get you into a majority of the money, about 60% of the outside money, has been raised from about 200 individuals. the number of people you could fit on an airplane have respecta small number of individual people. these people have contributed hundreds of millions of dollars to the process. i think the number that get you into a majority of the money
-year sentence, and was immediately reduced to one year due to an amnesty law from 2006. berlusconi was also fined 10 million euros and then form -- from holding public office for 10 years. the head of the media said television empire was accused of running a complex tax evasion system in the 1990's. prosecutors said berlusconi was part of a scheme to purchase broadcast rights to film through offshore companies and then inflate the cost to reduce taxes owed. the former prime minister will remain free until italy's appeal system is exhausted, a process that could be quite lengthy. >> for more on this case, we will tend to john hooper in rome. berlusconi was sentenced to four years but apparently will only serve one year if at all. how likely is it he will serve any time? >> very unlikely indeed. the italian judicial system is one in which trials take a long time, and there are also very generous statutes of limitation that time out cases often before they have completed the process, which involved two appeals. so there is a long way to run. it is almost certain that sometime late 2013, early
while worshiping. their perspective is humanistic and less dogmatic. they worship the son-in-law of the profit mohammad. men and women are symbolically equal, which they show by watching each other's hands. -- washing each other's hands. >> the creator made a man and woman out of a drop of water. if that is how he sought, why shouldn't we treat them equally? >> for sunnis, such an immense amount to heresy. they generally keep their traditions and songs to themselves. the syrian dictator is part of a related sect. >> if there is a dictatorship, the people should get rid of it. it is not the business of other countries to get involved. we have seen what has happened in the so-called arab spring. >> such statements don't win alawis much sympathy. they fear the consequences of a takeover by radical sunnis. >> the alawis fear this will intensify the language in turkey and around. although i personally think it is wrong to support assad on political grounds, i can understand the concerns the al awis have. >> buildings were spray-painted to mock them out. that is made family is afraid o
-- to asia had the most liberal family status law in the arab world since 1956, and after the revolution, islamists tried to change that, and it seems they've had at least partial success. >> who is responsible for this radical turn? >> the country is a lot more democratic, but nobody should have expected that everything would work smoothly, and tunisia would be a western-style democracy in a couple of years. tunisian society is highly divided, and we only saw the relatively liberal in the capital, but most of the population is extremely conservative. they have voted the islamists into office with about 35% of the vote, and now, they are under pressure of it even more conservative and radical elements. >> how much power to the religious extremists have in tunisia, and what's the danger the power could fall into their hands? >> they are not a strong -- as strong as in egypt. the islamists are strong, and they're right wing is relatively close in its opposite -- close in its positions on this issue to the extremists, but in general, the country is divided, but most of the larger political
for law and order so they can bring aid to those affected by the conflict. the agency says more than 28,000 people have been forced out of their homes in the e latest wave of fighting. it's clearly urgent that law and order be restored so that violence can be prevented and so that access is facilitated for aid to be delivered to those in need. >> the latest outbreak of violence between buddhists and muslims in the state of rakine has continued since october 21st. the local government says that at least 84 people have been killed. the conflict first erupted earlier this year after a group of muslims allegedly assaulted a buddhist woman. the united nations is suppes trefugees in the cy area. >> the camps in and around sitwe are already hosting most of the 75,000 people who remain displaced in the wave of violence that broke out in june this year. with a new influx these already crowded camps are being stretched beyond capacity in terms of space, shelter, and basic supplies. >> meanwhile, the association of southeast asian nations is promising to respond to conflict in one of its member co
in the hostilities and therefore to kill them would be a war crime under international law, under the geneva convention. noncombatants who are summarily executed, that constitutes a war crime. it went on to say the u.n. human rights council is gathering evidence of violations carried out by both sides in syria and building a case. it seems this video, too, will be part of the evidence, if that case comes up before the international criminal court. >> if it does take it further, what does that mean? what would achieve? >> we see people from the former warsaw in yugoslavia in the international criminal court at the hague now. people are tried. the people who are subject to those violations, the victims and victims' families are allowed to say what happened to them. very severe prison sentences are handed out. at the moment we are seeing one of the purposes of the international criminal court is not just to provide justice but to show future possible violators that the there is snow impunity. this is exactly what the u.n. is threatening this morning. if you commit a violation such as what appea
on with your life and another one where because of law enforcement tactics and focus, you end up caught up in a system where you can never move on. you're permanently trapped and weighed down by having a felony conviction. the reason i call it a war on crumbs is the type of people we see at the hall of justice, i brought with me some props. i brought with me a sweetener packet. this is a gram of sweetener. most of the time this is on the high end of the amount of narcotics we see people in possession of. sometimes people have two or three sweetener packages on them and we call them drug dealers, you know. that's why we call it a war on crumbs because the amounts we are talking about are mine us schedule. -- minnesota us schedule. the fact -- are miniscule. and based on less than a packet of sweetener, to me is outrageous. and to me this is a positive first step, in my opinion, because at least you remove some of the stigma attached to this type of issue which in my opinion should be a public health issue. it's a public health issue for a certain segment of the community and should be a pub
law obeyed in the second they saw was a rental car and a young kid, they pulled me over right away. he was the first time that a group the pattern that they looked for. and now of course they look for anything because the drug trade has become so profitable and lucrative. it's a $30 billion trade that anyone using anything, grandparents using rvs come to people in there as fishing boats and they go to the lake, doing anything because profits are enormous. so the cops are aware to look for that now. >> hipolito, how about your mexican background in relation to being able to infiltrate these groups? >> it was extremely important and yet i have to understand is that as soon as kind of thing that my spanish might not have been what it was from someone in mexico or central america when i was working on the cartels. the thing that it was brought out is the criminal element is not limited to hispanic american, but i was able to use my background again where i grew up, and seen some of the things that i grew up, so i was able to capitalize on my background, infiltrating. but what is important,
u.s. laws. is that true? joining us now jay secula the chief counsel for the american center for law and justice. they are coming from places like kazakhstan to texas and iowa and other states to make sure that we run free and fair electionses, jay, and they say if texas, as its threatened to do tries to arrest them or get up in their business, if they get out of line they can't. what is the truth? >> yeah, that's because the state department says there is this. you know, basically immunity situation almost like diplomatic immunity. this sounds like a scripp from a borat movie. the reality is. megyn: kazakhstan. >> observers from the osc which are in cooperation with the united nations are taking a serious position of questioning the integrity of the united states electoral process, and belaruse which is like the last remaining dictatorship in europe sent a specific statement complaining about our electoral college, the way our elections are seupt. i'm going to read you the response from the u.s. mission. this is our u.s. mission responding to belaruse a dictatorship. the united stat
rate of any country in the world. 2.3 million people. half of what we spend on law enforcement, the court and the prisons is drug related, and to what end. look, this is not about advocating drug use. 50% of kids graduating from high school have smoked marijuana. that's an issue that belongs with families, not in the criminal justice system. [applause] >> anybody have any rebuttal? >> i have to make my statements first, and then my rebuttal. so as a medical doctor previously in clinical practice for about 25 years, i can say with a real understanding of the science of the health impact, that marijuana is it a substance that is dangerous because it's illegal. it is not illegal on account of being dangerous. because it's not dangerous at all. [applause] it is well known that the impacts of marijuana are dangerous because of the illegal drug trade from marijuana drug prohibition. so the most important thing we can do to get rid of the health problems associated with marijuana is to legalize it. and on day one, on day one a president, if she wanted to, could entrust the d.e.a. to o
-thinking immigration policy. >> around the world waiting to come to this country and willing to respect our laws. i support legal immigration. i think we need changes to our immigration laws so that immigration is based more on talent and hard work and ability and skill so we have a pro-america immigration policy. with respect to children who are brocket here by their parents at the young age, i think we need a solution to the problem. congressman asked me last week if i had been in the house would i have voted. yes is the answer. the bill never made it through the senate. we need bipartisanship approaches i look forwarding with working with marco ruin ya to make sure a loss passes not that a single faction can pass something to the house. that's the difference between the house and the senate. the priority when i was there to secure the border. that's opened up opportunities to reform our immigration system. heinrich: wush of one of the thing things things is border patrol agencies to the board and hundreds of new custom about. that doesn't fix the underlying issue. we have proactive community. th
father-in-law died inherited three slaves. the first lady's great great grandmother and she ended up in a rough rural community in georgia, the vast majority of people were not slave voters, white men worked the fields along the slaves they own if they owned annie and it was quite a different experience than the one we often think about. >> it was quite a different experience and i really enjoyed reading about the people of that day, how she worked the fields and the men who owned her worked the fields. i know that you were not able to determine the relationship between millvinia and the men who owned her. and i also know, code of silence. she never talked about it and her descendants never talked about it. i noticed the same thing in her own family and other families as well. it is about wilkerson who wrote about the great migration, the same code of silence in her family. what is up with that code of silence? >> this is a painful chapter of american history for many families. so i think at the time, people knew. it would have been very clear to people. the people i met and intervie
, is on the better loss for adoption. -- better laws for adoption. we should encourage adoption in the united states of america with federal laws here in the state capital. and taxpayer funding of abortion -- our tax dollars should be used to fund medicare, and social security. and funding the military. they should not be used to fund abortions. sherrod brown is an extremist on the issue and supports using your tax dollars to fund abortion. we should not support abortions in the ninth month of pregnancy. but sheriff brown has an extremist position. can you explain to the people watching at home tonight, why do you support abortion in the ninth month of pregnancy. >> i have never heard anyone say that to me, judge. unlike judge mandel, -- josh. unlike josh mandel, my opponent has an extreme position and signed the exceptions for anything, rape and incest. i trust women to make decisions about their own health care. there are tens of thousands of women who get pregnant from rapes every year. it may not be something we want to acknowledged in the end, i will trust of high women to make -- i will trust
? are their pockets for the u.s. takes law enforcement? >> there are exceptions. there are still exceptions. one reason let me now have concluded as the frame that is being used by policymakers, the frame is not about investing. it is about capital expenditures when should be about operating expenditures. the frame is about government as believed. we're trying to work with our customers in those cities where we see receptive ears a meeting the leaders are hungry for really profound changes in the way the city operates. some of these are not the usual suspects. chattanooga, not the city on because you would expect on the left bank or otherwise. they decided to make the investment in building out broadband to every building in the city. piercing the economic benefits. it is not just the city government. it was their other vehicles. they were being smart. connecting the dots are hard. we're trying to break down the silo which tends to be the frame for which they think about it rather than looking across all of the boundaries to say what is it that is going to force collaboration and open the system
attack as a law enforcement matter, not as part of the war on terror, but as if it is a bank robbery. what we should have done with that suspect, when we learned he was in turkish custody was tell the turkish authorities, we want him. don't send him back to tunisia. this is not a matter of international extradition. this is a matter of taking somebody who has been engaged in war against the united states and we want him. we want hill and want to take him to gitmo to interrogate him. jon: i'm reminded when a couple of the suspect iss in the attack on the uss cole were apprehended and given back to yemen to be held in custody there. they escaped. so here is this tunisia guy, wanted in connection with the attack on our consulate there. apparently we have video and facial recognition software that puts him in our compound the night of the attack and yet he has been released, picked up by the turks but released to tunisia custody? >> this whole thing is like a reversion to before the original 9/11 in 2001. the clinton administration, these terrorist attacks, the world trade center, the fi
around the world not all of the laws are the same what can you do international become and how do you see this even if we got our act really together, how do you see the cooperation developing with foreign countries and other entities and so forth? >> i think that is a rapidly evolving area because there is no good international framework right now to deal with the international aspect of cyber investigation, cyber forensics and cyber deterrence if you think of prosecution as one kind of deterrent. there are some activities going on. for example, the u.s. and the e.u. have an ongoing cyber group by the league of budapest in this month actually come and they are working for some of these issues. the regular topics of the meetings that eric holder ready and i have with our counterparts in europe and in the g6 so we are trying to develop agreements, protocols and the like that will improve the international reach in this area. but it is very a much an act in progress. >> we will take one more question because she has to leave. right here. >> i'm understand that you have to head off to the fe
center for justice, 14 states have laws restricting voter registration drive, early voting, forcing some voters to show an idea. those 14 states are worth 185 electoral votes, 68% of what's needed to win. so, is voting fraud a big problem? will what i just said affect the election? nicole austin hilary joins us from washington this morning. good morning. >> good morning, carol. >> let's talk about these new laws put in place in many states across the nation. how will this affect voting tuesday? >> in 2011, the brennan center issued a report. when we first saw the onslaught of these laws being introduced across the country. we were extremely worried because it looked like up to 5 million voters would be impacted by these laws in such a way where many of them might have their right to vote encumbered. we issued a new report, however, a year later. it just came out last week -- early this week that showed that because of the pushback that happened across the country, because of the department of justice, citizen referenda, court and other initiatives, there has been a great deal of success
the law, because there are laws on the books that prevent these things from taking some shapes. but we've seen in europe, asia and other parts of the world really interesting ways of inventing the process of partnering that don't involve giving away public assets and public goods. nobody's talking about that. >> i think the other thing, and i talked about this earlier, i think some structural changes need to be made to how government functions. right now there is, there are very, very, very few cities who have any type of an entity that's tasked with looking out and across. and the way cities are set up now, the way agencies are set up now, the way the budgets are allocated, they do not foster innovation. you can go to pretty much any agency in any city in this country, okay, and their planning budget, their project plan has been set up for the next three to five years. it doesn't foster innovation. and so having, creating an entity that is empowered, okay, to find innovation, to drive innovation across these agencies that has a budge is one -- budget is one of the steps to get there.
of law was applied a little bit more broadly and not necessarily for any other reason other than making sure there wouldn't be n new entrance to this kind ofw special club. >> host: in the western pressw during this crisis or uprising in syria, alepo was described as the commercial center of the country. why is that? tell us about that city. >> guest: for several hundred years, if not more, it was the meeting point between europe and asia and always developed a -- developed as a center of trade and commerce. that comet -- continued, of course, throughout the centuries throughout the 20th century and made it what it is in terms of its trade, in terms of its trade potential. now, also, it's a large city, not just a second city, it has been a place where many traders and manufacturers as well preferred either because it was historically quite vibrant or because it was far away from the center where they might have a bit more freedom, even though that margin of freedom was not wide. >> host: where are you from originally? >> guest: i'm lebanese, but my mother is syrian. >> host: lebanon
and movement for when this in west africa wrested control from more moderate tuaregs. they oppose sharia law in places like timbuktu, formerly a leading tourist attraction. music and alcohol are prohibited. women have to wear veils. punishments are draconian. in the capital in the south, moderate muslims set the tone, and yet, the defacto loss of 2/3 of their national territory hurts, especially since many have relatives in the north. then i i am very afraid. if we do not succeed in solving the crisis in the north, we risk having the islamists come down south. >> the crisis is very bad for my country. i would like to put an end to it at any cost. >> the country has always depended on outside assistance, and we need it now more than ever. if we were able to solve the crisis ourselves, we would have already done so. we need an external help. we cannot do it alone. >> the army is poorly trained and equipped, and the state is politically weak. the provisional government which took power after a coup in march is divided within itself. last month, the government asked the united nations for help,
? he said i oppose a federal open housing law and this year i support the 1968 civil rights bill with open housing. which way will he blow next? chris: flip-flop ads were used by the two president bushes starting here with george bush 41 slamming bill clinton in 199 and then george w. bush's famous 2004 wind surfing ad against john kerry. >> presidential candidate on the left stood for military action in the persian gulf while the candidate on the right agreed with those who opposed it. one of these candidates is bill clinton. unfortunately, so is the other. in which direction would john kerry lead? kerry voted for the iraq war. opposed it. supported it. and now opposes it again. john kerry. whichever way the wind blows. chris: funny thing is the guy who made that wind surfing ad that's bush's advisor mark mckinnon worked also for john mccain in 2008. and here's the recycled hand he work for mccain against primary opponent mitt romney. >> mitt romney seems to change positions like the wind. he tells florida he supports the bush tax cuts. but as massachusetts governor romney refus
mali. they've destroyed shrines, impose period sahria law and stoned people who come in their wake. now, mali was once considered one of the few stable democracies in africa, and mali's capital would normally have been able to counteract these insurgents. but the government tripped up this year. a coup took place in march. in the aftermath, soldiers deserted the army. there are reports many even sold their equipment for money. so mali is essentially defenseless. last month the interim president called on the security council to help. seems increasingly likely there will be some military intervention. already a regional group called ecowas, economic community of west african states, is pulling together a small army. france is leading the calls for action. it has submitted a proposal to the u.n. for malayan soldier to be trained by the european union. those soldiers will then join a few thousand ecowas troops to retake northern mali. remember, mali was a french colony until 1960. france continues to have trade interests in the region. what about washington's role? haven't our leaders prom
the health care law. medicare open enrollment. now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. ♪ >>> now for our "what in the world" segment. in the final presidential debate, the one on foreign policy, it was interesting to note the countries that got a mention. iran was cited 47 times, of course. israel, 34 times. and china, 32 times. it was also telling, there was only one mention each of europe and africa, and none at all of india. but i was struck by the amount of play one small country got. the one doesn't usually register on washington's foreign policy radar. >> mali -- >> mali -- >> with a gdp 1% of mexico. why mali? here's the story briefly. radical islamist groups have taken control of as much as 2/3 of mali's territory, including the historic city of timbuktu. among these groups is al qaeda and the islamic maghreb, said to have been involved in last month's attack on the consulate in benghazi, libya. together the radical outfits have tormented mali. they've destroyed shrines, imposed sharia law and stoned people who come in their wake. now, mali was once considere
of the damage, he was able to pick out different homes, well, my sister lives in this one, her father in law lives in this one. three elderly sisters, live side by side by side. he was able to see what was gone, what was missing. homes there that caught fire. we have others along the bay. those also completely destroyed. some of them have been knocked off foundations. others are sinking into the sand. there are those where the front have completely sheared off. all of that will have to be rebuilt. we did speak to some folks and they said, you know, it's a community and they will get it done. >> the exterior of the house is destroyed, and not only from the fire melts, but also from the surge. the tidal surge that happened here, the exterior, things are just thrown around and as we walked around, you can see that. it was not just devastation from the fire that's here. it's from the tidal surge. >> it's so devastating to be here to see it. it's like a war zone to us. >> reporter: now, there are a couple of people who live here year round. there was one firefighter who actually helped. he said,
, which is pursuing a nuclear weapons program contrary to international norms and laws. so when the u.s. is negotiating with iran, i think we should keep that in mind. and i don't think the united states officially wants to implode the iranian government or have the iranian government collapse or have the iranian government capitulate. i think our goals are pretty well defined. we want iran to stop enriching uranium to a higher degree that can be used for a nuclear weapon, period. and i think that's very achievable. part of the problem is iran's supreme leader, ayatollah khamenei, like ken said, is inflexible. he's even more inflexible than khomeini was, and there are indications that his advisers including within the revolutionary guards are not happy with him. he's been criticized even publicly for his decisions and style of rule. and when we look at the islamic republic, this is not a system that's different than the other authoritarian regimes that have been overthrown in the middle east. it is corrupt, it denies its people basic rights, social, political and economic, it discrimi
approach than some of those around him like his late brother in law or his brother, but it really doesn't matter. it's in material. we see the situation. we know what it is. and it's going to continue. i think increasingly there's a consensus at what the situation is in syria and what some of the pitfalls are. you know, i think there's much more realism now than there was a year ago. about what's going on in that country. and much more sober assessment on the part of u.s. officials and others as to what can and can't be done. certainly, being a former diplomat, you would not be surprised to find out that a belief that this, we should be leaning a diplomatic effort. but i'm not a fan of those who want to blame america for the situation, or blame american action up to now for the terrible deterioration that has taken place. remember jeane kirkpatrick at a republican convention, i think we nominating ronald reagan, excoriating the democrats are also the blaming america first. i would say to our arab friends, you have to be careful, too, because first we were to present in the middle east,
have wood-burning fireplaces, there's a new law you need to know about or you can end up in smoke school. in 2008, the bay area air quality district launched its first winter "spare the air" program. staff meteorologists were diligently compiling information to determine if an alert should be issued. today is not a winter "spare the air" day here throughout the tri-valley and it's pretty obvious. the sky is blue and the clouds are big and puffy. but if it was a winter "spare the air" day, this view would be compromised due to one major culprit. >> serious air pollution problem of the because of the health impact it's now illegal in the bay area to burn wood or fire logs on days when there's a winter "spare the air" alert. >> reporter: but this year, new laws are in place for violators lighting manufactured logs or wood in an indoor or outdoor fireplace during alert days. christine rosales explains. >> first time violators will have the option to take a wood smoke awareness course and that gives them information about the weather conditions that lead up to unhealthy air quality in
funding. there was a law passed in 1933 that basically said you can only invest in companies if you're rich. this allows kind of democratizes access to investing and also democratizes for individual investors who want to invest and also those who want to access to capital for entrepreneurs. it's probably not that important or that helpful in silicon valley because there's tons of money and venture capitalists in silicon valley. it's really important in places like detroit. so now you'll have the ability next year toes, basically, put your business online, explain what you're trying to do, and people can make an investment up to $10,000 each, and if your income is a earn level, it's only up to $2,000. there are and people can raise up to a million dollars in total through this mechanism, and that will be the difference for, i think, thousands of entrepreneurs that otherwise wouldn't have been able to start a company or to have the beginnings of something, they wouldn't be able to scale the company. so i think it's an e nor pows opportunity for -- enormous opportunity for underserved
, leading important financial institutions after degrees from dartmouth, hbs and harvard law school and started his career with the philadelphia investment accounting film dealer. it was later bought i united asset management which churn for eventually ran he became the u. of delaware messman and next he was called to run putnam investments here in boston and even larger management firm that has advanced to the previous management. he righted that it eventually sold a good price for shareholders to a large canadian financial firm. it was at that time that we approached add to run. freddie and fannie, together with a broader issue of u.s. government involvement in housing finance is one of the major unfinished pieces of business and financial regulatory reform. it's clearly an important issue. we c-span here filming this. ed has the unique perspective. an experienced manager of the frontline running the gics and most thoughtful public policy participant. he's done when the talk about where the gics have been and what to do with them. my great pleasure to introduce ed haldeman. [appla
gorgeous daughter-in-law mary. as you can see, she's expecting another grandchild, so we're -- we're thrilled about that. it's wonderful to have all these grandsons. everyone knows i have five sons. everyone knows a lot of you know i have 18 grandchildren. what you probably don't know, 13 of them are boys. we sure are glad that we like boys it in our family. it sure makes it a lot easier. i think that boys add such a dimension to my life. they taught me a lot of patience. you know the other things the boys taught me which is great. hey it all on the table. and then it's over. it's amazing what you learn from children. and it's great. i am so thrilled to have had these extraordinary women that talked to you earlier. are we not lucky to have such strong women? [applause] there's probably no one on this stage can appreciate the sentiment i'm about to talk to you better than cindy mccain, when after the last debate, when her husband won fair and square, i looked at the camera, i got myself a video camera and i looked at it and i made this video for mitt and i stayed sweetheart, i'm ne
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